Jnaapti – A 6 month Report

This post is not quite about Jnaapti‘s vision and why I am doing it, but more about things that I have learnt since I founded Jnaapti.

I can’t believe it has been more than 6 months already and what an experience it has been! I can easily blog a few hundred pages about my experiences, but here is the MVP (Minimum Valuable Post) – the key things that other wantrepreneurs and newbie entrepreneurs can learn from:

  • The art of self-discipline: If there is one thing that I should pick among the various things that I learnt in the last 6 months, I would pick being self-disciplined and maintaining a rhythm in the face of distractions that are not under your control. Time management is extremely important. When you are handling all aspects of business, there is a good chance that you need to meet someone at their convenience, or you are asked to provide a service (in my case training) and these are not under your control. So you need to get really good at handling these, and getting back to your work as soon as this is complete. For productivity freaks, I use a combination of Pomodoro technique, Hamster, Workrave, this hack and a simple Libreoffice document to manage all my data. I wish it could have been simpler and someday, I hope to continue my efforts in building productivity tools.
  • Get out of the building: I can’t stress this enough. Nearly everytime I got out of the building and started speaking to people, there was some new insight or a business deal that happened. A lot of the times, it seems purely co-incidental (read the next point). The initial couple of weeks were very haphazard and it just seemed like a humongous project that was lying in front of me. While I did have a huge list of tasks/ideas to work on, I didn’t know where to begin. What should I build now? No clear answers. As I started hunting for answers, I ran into the Lean Startup concepts and fell in love with Ash Maurya, Eric Ries and Steve Blank‘s philosophies. I followed the lean canvas way of capturing the business model religiously and it has worked out very well. If anything, it helped reduce noise, cut to the chase and build something of value “now”. The idea of prioritizing validation and learning before scale has worked in my favor. The first cut of Jnaapti’s offering didn’t even have a software component and was entirely conducted over email – because I realized that the MVP didn’t need a software component. I concentrated less on the website messaging, since most of my contacts were through my personal network.
  • The strange story of co-incidences and chance meetings: Nearly every business contract I got seems like a pure chance meeting and the more this happens the more you believe in what is written here. This kind of also proves that there is a critical mass of startups in Bangalore now, and there is a good chance that you will bump into someone who is a startup founder or early employee when you visit coffee shops or technical events. This has worked out so well that I have made it a point to meet, on an average one or two new people every week. Till date, I have met more than 80 new people (including Jnaapti Learners), and that’s an average of 10 people per month!
  • My experiments with pricing: An early learning for me was about how you need to get pricing right and it’s almost always never. The inital couple of months I was demanding way too less for my services and slowly as I found out the value of my services, I tweaked it to a point which seems reasonable both for me and my clients. But that said, every new assignment is a new negotiation.
  • Understanding waste reduction: When you are the only person working, and you have the 3 aspects of an organization in front of you – business, product and engineering – every moment you spend, you need to think twice. Is this the best use of my time? It helps a lot to reflect on how you spent your time and look at what you could have rather NOT done. This is the art of waste reduction.

    On a similar note, I have started maintaining what are called “Implementation reports” for Jnaapti’s product development phases. An implementation report is an assessment of

    • how a specific phase fared
    • what features we set out to build
    • what was our reasoning about why they should be built
    • how are the features being used now
    • if they are not beng used, why so
    • can its usage be improved
    • should it be chucked
    • how can we ensure that we don’t have such waste in future
  • Getting to ramen profitability: There is one thing I can tell you. We, as software engineers in India, don’t value money (I am speaking generally). We get an awesome package (stop cribbing you guys) right out of college, and then we get into this spiral of work-get paid-work harder-get promoted-ask for a raise. And when things don’t work in our favor, we start complaining or switch our jobs looking for a better role or more pay. If you want to value money better, quit your job to know what others go through. In the face of inflation, the rupee v/s dollar prices and rising infrastructure costs it has been tough to keep up, but then you got to pay a price. I am close to achieveing ramen profitability and I hope things will be better next year. And while achieving ramen profitability is important, it is equally important to ensure that you achieve profitability via the business you are in and not via some job that doesn’t help you validate or learn more about your business. And yeah, if you want a piece of advice, to get to ramen profitability soon, just invest your savings in some place that is not easy to suck from!

I have taken enough breaks and I never felt that this was too demanding (although I do put in long hours once in a while). Needless to say, I am loving the freedom and the flexibility that I have and I wish I can continue this forever! Overall, it has been an amazing 6 months!

9 Comments

  1. Nice one Gautham.
    We would like you to write more on the product you have been working on. With that you could share the vision you have and how your approach is different.

  2. Hi Amjed,

    Thanks for stopping by! :)

    I do have a long list of blog posts that I wish to make elaborating on the Jnaapti vision, the problem that I intend to solve and my approach. Let’s see when that happens.

    Gautham

  3. Wonderful post Gautham. Hope to hear more from you regarding your work.

  4. It was fun reading your learnings Gautham. I do not have much to give any feedback :(

    I am just happy to see that you are doing what your heart is telling you to do!

    I would also like to read more about Jnaapti vision. How do you prounce Jnaapti btw?

    All the best!

  5. Thanks Manoj. I will soon write about the Jnaapti vision.

    Ajit: Jnaapti is pronounced almost like g-ny-aa-pti. It is a Sanskrit word and there is a letter in Sanskrit for “Jna” -> ???.

    I had imagined people outside India having a problem pronouncing this, never thought Indians would!

  6. Its nice to see a blogpost of the 6 months of your startup experience.. so when are u hiring ???

  7. Hi machbio,

    I have started looking around – although haven’t pressed the pedal to the metal yet.

  8. Hi Gautham, I really liked your post. You make good points for everyone whether working for yourself or not. I also like the pictures of the flower show. Nice.

    [Edited: Admin removed link to an irrelevant site – for more info refer to – http://buzypi.in/about/comment-acceptance/ ]

  9. Hi Gautham.
    Wonderful points to grab and learn from. Appreciate your first point which is very difficult when you have complete freedom of time on you. Congrats on your 6 months performance. All the best for your product too.

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